International Code for the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Sea (IMDG Code) IMDG CODE

The International Code of the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Sea (IMDG Code) was introduced by the Assembly of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) on September 27.09.1965, 81 (Resolution A.XNUMX (IV)) and is recommended for use in countries that have signed the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. Currently, the IMDG Code is a universally recognized international document regulating the carriage of dangerous goods by sea.

Compliance with the RID Committee ensures compliance with the mandatory provisions of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS-74), as amended, and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL 73 / 78).

In 1960, the Conference on the Safety of Human Life at Sea recommended that governments adopt a single international classification for the transport of dangerous goods by sea to complement the provisions contained in the 1960 International Convention for the Protection of Life at Sea (SOLAS). This is how the RID MC appeared.

The resolution adopted at the conference in the year 1960, approved that the proposed code should cover issues such as packaging, container transport and storage, with special emphasis on the segregation of incompatible substances.

The Working Group on the Maritime Safety Committee of the IMO has started the preparation of the Code in the year 1961, in close cooperation with the United Nations Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, which the report 1956, the established minimum requirements for the transport of dangerous goods all modes of transport.

Agreement on the International Maritime Dangerous Goods. IMDG Code was developed as a single international contract for the carriage of dangerous goods by sea, it covers issues such as packaging, container transport and storage, with special emphasis on the segregation of incompatible substances. 

Since its adoption by the IMO Assembly in the fourth year 1965, IMDG Code has undergone many changes, both in appearance and content, to keep pace with the ever-changing needs of the industry. 

The amendments to the IMDG Code derive from a proposal submitted directly to IMO by the Member States and the amendments necessary for adoption due to a change in the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, which sets out the basic requirements for all modes of transport.

Amendments to the provisions of the United Nations Recommendations are made on the basis of two-year cycle, and about two years after their adoption, they accepted the authorities responsible for the regulation of different transport modes. Thus, a basic set of requirements applicable to all transport modes is established and implemented, thus ensuring that problems do not occur at the intermodal interfaces.

For the purposes of this Code, the dangerous goods are classified in different classes, to subdivide a number of these classes, as well as to identify and describe the characteristics and properties of the substances, materials and articles that fall within each class or subclass. General provisions for each class or subclass are shown.

Some dangerous goods are listed in the list of dangerous goods to a class and specific requirements.
According to marine pollutants eligibility criteria for the purposes of Annex III of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 years relating thereto (MARPOL 73 / 78), a number of hazardous substances in the various classes also have been identified as substances harmful to the marine environment.

IMDG Code has been adopted as an international benchmark for safe transport or transport of dangerous goods or hazardous materials.

The implementation of the Code is mandatory in connection with the obligations of members of a single national government under the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL 73 / 78). It is intended to be used not only by the mariner, but also by all those involved in shipping.

IMDG Code Contains guidance on terminology, packaging, labeling, segregation, handling and emergency response. The HNS Convention covers hazardous and noxious substances that are included in the IMDG Code.

Code is updated and maintained by CCC (previously DSC) Sub-Committee on International Marine, the organization every year 2.